Science Breakthroughs to Advance Food and Agricultural Research by 2030 (2019) / Chapter Skim
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Appendix C: IdeaBuzz Submissions Synopsis and Contributors
Pages 219-228

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From page 219...
... Appendix C IdeaBuzz Submissions Synopsis and Contributors Instructions for IdeaBuzz Tell us your idea for innovative research that could elevate the science of food and agriculture. In describing your idea, please com ment on how the science and engineering approach you describe might: ? Address a major challenge in food and agriculture ? Create a novel opportunity for advances in food and agricul tural science ? Help overcome a technological barrier ? Fill a fundamental knowledge gap that currently holds back progress in the fields of food and agriculture The responses to IdeaBuzz were reviewed by staff and separated into the following categories: greener plants/crops, animal agriculture, food loss/ waste, food safety, resilience/sustainable change, and miscellaneous.
From page 220...
... In research, work needs to be done on which plants grow well together, and how they can interact to benefit soil/insect health and keep pests away without using any inorganic sprays or products ? Agriculture, biodiversity, and health ? Genetic engineering for sustainable management of crop diseases o RISPR, disease-resistant crops C ? Bring agriculture and horticulture sciences closer to home o esearch, development, and implementation of green roofs, R vertical farming, cave farming, hydroponics ? Rebuilding soil microbial communities in agroecosystems ? Soil carbon restoration -- regenerative agriculture -- our only path forward ? Make vegetables cheaper and easier to eat o  Invest in social and technological sciences
From page 221...
... So breed low-protein maize for high starch or oil yields without nitrogen fertilizer, while breeding low-oil soy beans that yield lots of protein using nitrogen from symbiosis ? New tools to protect our forests from lethal invasive pathogens and insects ? Soil security o  Protocols for measures, development of technology, valuation of soil as natural capital, evaluation of practices
From page 222...
... ? Integrate agricultural and ecological sciences to understand patho gen spread o nderstand AMR bacteria transmission across agricultural– U wildlife interface ? Incorporate aquaculture into the discussion of food and agriculture ? Food waste into animal feed o ew food packaging materials that are digestible by animals, N fish, and/or insects ? Insects are more efficient animal feed ? End torture: Ten billion factory farm animals are legally mutilated annually in the United States without any form of anesthetic or pain relief ? Irrational overregulation of transgenic technologies ? Opportunities in clean meat o ultured meat C ? Harness the power of microbes to enhance agricultural sustainability ? Accelerating genetic improvements by cycling of gametes in vitro ? Food for 2050 and beyond o ultured meat and other food tissues C ? Broadening the range of plants/animals that can be effectively engineered ? Microbiome of the rumen: The time is right for a comprehensive study of the microbiome of the rumen in food animals, including the determinants of colonization of the gut after birth, the role of the microbiome in nutrition and gastrointestinal health, and par ticularly, its relationship to the animal's immune system
From page 223...
... ? Improving human health, nutrition, and wellness of the U.S. population ? Gain more public support for GMOs ? Bioremediation ? Integrate agricultural and ecological sciences to understand patho gen spread o nderstand AMR bacteria transmission across agricultural– U wildlife interface ? Evidence-based decisions empower food policies and consumer health o  agricultural, medical, and social science communities need The to team up to provide factual, science-based food information in a form easily assimilated by policy makers, professional soci eties, and consumers ? Agriculture, biodiversity, and health ? Environmental impacts of meeting future human nutrition needs ? Universal in vitro or in silico test for the edibility of a novel sub stance is a fundamental technology gap in the fields of food and agriculture ? Clean food process technology development o  inimal processing technologies M ? Biofilm control needed for crop cultivation and food safety ? New tools to protect our forests from lethal invasive pathogens and insects ? Method to rid food safety issues associated with chilled soups o  rapid volumetric heating methods E.g., ? Nanoscale sensors for food characteristic identification
From page 224...
... ? Research on cropping systems, including economics, markets, and infrastructure ? Evidence-based decisions empower food policies and consumer health o  agricultural, medical, and social science communities need The to team up to provide factual, science-based food information in a form easily assimilated by policy makers, professional soci eties, and consumers ? Agriculture global change challenges o abitat fragmentation resulting from land-use change (expand H ing agricultural, forestry, and urban areas) leads to biodiversity loss ? Bring agriculture and horticulture sciences closer to home o esearch, development, and implementation of green roofs, R vertical farming, cave farming, hydroponics ? Avoid framing traps: Keeping science and technology in appropri ate context o  Technologism, productivism, efficiency-based sustainability, and reductivism
From page 225...
... APPENDIX C 225 ? Pay farmers for multiple ecosystem services, especially smallholders ? Do not forget the consumer: Engage citizens, applied economists, behavioral economists, and communicators in the development of the priorities ? Regenerating ecosystem services in grazing ecosystems o ow different management strategies impact causal mecha H nisms that drive biological function and socioeconomic out comes at local and landscape scales ? Deregulation of genome-editing technologies ? Irrational overregulation of transgenic technologies ? Train more people in food and agricultural research ? Analytical laboratories for developing countries o eed for ways to get soil, water, plant, and other types of N samples analyzed continues to be a stumbling block that keep agricultural programs, both research and applied, from moving forward ? Sustainable and resilient agroecosystems in a changing world o  Sufficient understanding of the mechanisms behind individual behavioral change at the farm/field level or at the systems level in response to the risks and uncertainties posed by a rapidly changing world ? A framework for client-oriented agriculture ? A paradigm shift to agroecology: Context and conservation in agriculture ? All new technologies need a commercialization strategy o  Feed the Future Partnering for Innovation program E.g., ? Obstacles to big data in plant-level decision making for agriculture o ata ownership, data validity, data standardization, data band D width, data availability, and model practicality ? The risks of multiple breadbasket failures in the 21st century o eed for and movement toward improved probabilistic model N ing and prediction of multiple breadbasket failure events and their potential consequences for global food systems ? Soil security o  Protocols for measures, development of technology, valuation of soil as natural capital, evaluation of practices ? Collaborative research by agricultural, nutrition, natural, and social scientists could reduce this knowledge gap and improve performance across the food system
From page 226...
... F Denison, University of Minnesota Reid Detchon, United Nations Foundation Jorge Dubcovsky, Howard Hughes Medical Institute William Fisher, Institute of Food Technologists Alan Franklin, Research Scientist Janet Franklin, School of Geographical Sciences & Urban Planning Alan Franzluebbers, U.S.
From page 227...
... Johnson, Retired Farmer and Author Sean Patrick Kearney, University of British Columbia Anita Klein, University of New Hampshire Jane Kolodinsky, University of Vermont Michael Kotutwa Johnson, University of Arizona Nicola Kubzdela, Student Timothy LaSalle, International Regenerative Agriculture and Climate Ken Lee, The Ohio State University Daniel Magraw, Johns Hopkins University Andrew P Manale David H
From page 228...
... Thomasson, Texas A&M University Michael Tlusty, University of Massachusetts Boston Michael Twiggs Paul Vincelli, University of Kentucky Matthew Wallenstein, Colorado State University Chandler Wiland Cathy M Wilson, Idaho Wheat Commission Michael Wilson Robyn Wilson, The Ohio State University


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